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Manifestos

A summary of each of the main party policy pledges as laid out in their election manifestos.

 
Manifestos of the Northern Ireland Parties

Manifestos of the Northern Ireland Parties

A brief summary of the manifestos from the Northern Ireland Assembly parties.

Plaid Cymru's Election Manifesto 2015: Gweithio dros Gymru - Working for Wales

Plaid Cymru's Election Manifesto 2015: Gweithio dros Gymru - Working for Wales

Here you'll find a summary of Plaid Cymru's policy pledges that will be of interest to many evangelical Christians. Setting out to lay the foundations of a post-austerity Wales, their pledges include pay rises for 250,000 Welsh workers to bring them up to a living wage, and to train and recruit 1,000 doctors to safeguard the future of the NHS in Wales.

SNP's election manifesto: Stronger for Scotland

SNP's election manifesto: Stronger for Scotland

The SNP publish their manifesto with pledges of what they would want the future government of the UK to do. They promise to end austerity and increase taxes on the richest. They also intend to press for more powers for Scotland and full financial autonomy.

Conservatives' Election Manifesto 2015: A brighter more secure future

Conservatives' Election Manifesto 2015: A brighter more secure future

Here you'll find a summary of the Conservatives' policy pledges as laid out in their election manifesto. In an effort to convince voters that the Conservatives remain the best party to lead the country, Cameron has reached into the Thatcher era to revive the right-to-buy scheme which proved so popular in the 1980s. Today in Swindon David Cameron launched the Conservative's general election manifesto leading with the promise to extend the right-to-buy scheme for housing association tenants.

Labour's Election Manifesto 2015: Britain can be better

Labour's Election Manifesto 2015: Britain can be better

Here you'll find a summary of Labour's policy pledges as laid out in their election manifesto. This week sees the political parties releasing their party manifestos. In what is shaping up to be one of the most tightly contested elections, voters will no doubt be looking to how the parties will differ in their vision and plan for Britain's future. At this stage there doesn't seem to be a lot of difference between the major parties. The Conservatives, Labour and Liberal Democrats have all promised to get rid of the current deficit. While the Conservatives and Liberal Democrats have set a target o 2017/18, Labour isn't committing to a date instead offering the rather ambiguous commitment of "as soon as possible".

Greens' Election Manifesto 2015: For the common good

Greens' Election Manifesto 2015: For the common good

Here you'll find a summary of the Greens' policy pledges as laid out in their election manifesto. The Green Party manifesto, unveiled by leader Natalie Bennett and the party’s only MP Caroline Lucas, calls for a “peaceful political revolution” to end austerity and tackle climate change. They makes some grand promises including increasing the minimum wage to £10 an hour, insulating nine million homes, increasing pensions, a million new public sector jobs and “taking back” the NHS and railways from the private sector.

Liberal Democrats' Election Manifesto 2015: Stronger Economy. Fairer Society. Opportunity for Everyone.

Liberal Democrats' Election Manifesto 2015: Stronger Economy. Fairer Society. Opportunity for Everyone.

Here you'll find a summary of the Liberal Democrats' policy pledges as laid out in their election manifesto. The Liberal Democrats launched their election manifesto on the basis that no party would be able to govern alone after the election. In an effort to entice voters, leader Nick Clegg declared that the Liberal Democrats would be act as a “barrier” to prevent UKIP or the SNP holding the balance of power and, “add heart to a Conservative government and…a brain to a Labour one”. Clegg went on to say their manifesto was a sensible “insurance policy” against extreme cuts or reckless borrowing. As would be expected with such a middle of the road approach, the manifesto has little in the way of setting a clear, distinct path. Rather Clegg has hedged his bets on voters seeing them as a safe, centrist option. This is an expected approach given the Liberal Democrats have had five years to prove they are a viable coalition partner.